full
color
#666666
https://ninemilerun.org/wp-content/themes/zap-installable/
https://ninemilerun.org/
#009dba
style3
27
May

As you may have seen in our Voltarol suppositories over the counter uk, since 2013 we have been working with the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy (PPC) on a grant received from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation’s Five Star and Urban Waters Restoration Program. One of the goals of our partnership on this grant was to develop a culture of stewardship for the Nine Mile Run watershed by engaging a wide range of ages in citizen science and stewardship activities. One way we approached this was to implement PPC’s Mission Ground Truth (MGT) program at Wilkinsburg Middle School.

MGT is an interdisciplinary ecosystem assessment program mapped to PA state academic standards for 7th and 8th grade students that includes in-class discovery activities as well as a field trip to Frick Park. During the field trip, students get to be ecologists for the day, and have the opportunity to use the same tools and sampling methods that scientists use to evaluate the health of forest and stream ecosystems.

Recently, NMRWA staff worked for two days in Frick Park with Environmental Educators from PPC to help lead the Wilkinsburg Middle School students through the field day programming.

Jared, Mike, & the students get ready for a leaf race!

Jared, Mike, & the students get ready for a leaf race!

We began each morning by discussing goals for the day, then broke into small groups. During the morning session, the groups each explored a section of the Fern Hollow stream while discussing questions such as “how can ecologists detect and measure pollution in a stream?” and “what benefits do humans and animals get from streams?” Then the students recorded data on physical and chemical water quality characteristics, such as temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and velocity. Next, we explored the benthic macroinvertebrate populations by carefully overturning rocks and collecting samples using a net. To wrap up, we would discuss how everything tied together by asking questions like “based on the data we collected, is the stream healthy or unhealthy?“and “how does the quality of Fern Hollow affect the health of Nine Mile Run?

Mike & a student measure the diameter of a tree.

Mike & a student measure the diameter of a tree.

After a break for lunch, the students got to venture into the forest for a deeper look at the complex forest ecology present in Frick Park. We identified different tree and plant species and talked about the various ecosystem services that forests provide to animals, streams, and people. We asked questions like “why is biodiversity important in forests?” and “how is the health of this forest related to the health of Fern Hollow and Nine Mile Run?” Then the students used forestry tools to collect data on the location, size, and type of trees, and we looked for evidence of Asian long-horned beetles. To wrap up, we asked questions similar to the morning session, like “is this section of the forest healthy or unhealthy?

Over the course of the two days, we had a wonderful & enriching experience working with the students and with the PPC staff. Thank you to Mike, Taiji, Steve, and Chelsea for their expertise & enthusiasm in implementing the MGT programming!

05
Nov

People are often surprised to learn that yes, there are fish living in Nine Mile Run and in fact… there are rather a LOT of them!

Led by NMRWA Monitoring Committee members Brady Porter and Michael Koryak, fish sampling is performed on an annual basis, typically in the fall. Since the stream restoration was completed in 2006, their data have shown marked improvement in the number and diversity of fish in the stream.

Immediately post-restoration, the entire stream was electro-fished and only 116 fish comprising seven different species were found. Today, it’s impossible to sample the entire length of the stream in one day due to the number of fish and time it would take to process them all!

For example, last Wednesday, NMRWA Monitoring Committee members and other volunteers sampled for fish in lower Nine Mile Run. Beginning at the mouth of the stream near Duck Hollow in the morning, and traveling upstream to finish just below the pedestrian bridge in the late afternoon, we caught nearly 2,300 fish comprising 17 different species! This is the second highest species count ever found in this section of the stream – 21 species were found in 2011.

Additionally, we found two new species that had never been collected from Nine Mile Run before: Duloxetine hcl dr generic and Kamagra online bestellen günstig. The addition of these two species brings the total species count of fish collected from this stretch of Nine Mile Run since 1999 to 30!

This week, barring inclement weather, we will finish our fish sampling for the year when we sample a section of the stream in the main part of Frick Park.

As always, thanks to Brady and Mike and all the volunteers who help make this important sampling effort happen!

Want to learn more about our stream monitoring work? Head on over to our Generic cialis online uk for more information and nifty, interactive data maps!

11
Apr

A recap of the UES Spring Invasives Workshop

This past Sunday, April 6, 2014, nearly forty enthusiastic volunteers attended the Spring Invasives Workshop in Lower Frick Park offered by NMRWA and the Orlistat hexal online bestellen schweiz. It was a beautiful, sunny day, perfect for Jake Baechle, Volunteer Coordinator for the Parks Conservancy, and Paul Yanulavich, Urban EcoSteward Coordinator and Arborist for NMRWA, to talk about the Buy finasteride 1mg uk and the importance of invasive plant removal and its connection to biodiversity.

For example, did you know that many plants from the nursery that people use in their gardens are specifically bred to be pest-free? Unfortunately, many of these plants find their way into Pittsburgh’s parks, where they have an unfair advantage over native plants.

While these invasive, pest-free plants are problematic for numerous reasons, one big one is that they affect the reproduction and survival of butterflies and moths. Butterflies and moths are not only unable to eat these plants, but they also are unable to lay their eggs on them, since they will ultimately need to be eaten by the young caterpillars.

The monarch butterfly’s life cycle is closely tied to seasonal growth of milkweed, the only plant its larvae will eat. These pictures are from Frick Park! (Photos: John Moyer)

The monarch butterfly’s life cycle is closely tied to seasonal growth of milkweed, the only plant its larvae will eat. These pictures are from Frick Park!
(Photos: John Moyer)

One example of note is the monarch butterfly. Monarch butterflies’ main food source are native milkweed plants in the US & Mexico. Milkweed is the only plant Monarchs will lay their eggs on, which unfortunately is vanishing at a rapid rate, particularly in the Great Plains states along the Monarch butterfly’s migration route, due to increased use of herbicides. Order flagyl online next day delivery – at their peak in the 1990’s, Monarch butterflies occupied 45 acres of forest in the Mexican mountains; this past year they covered only 1.65 acres!

This lack of food and reproductive space for Monarchs as well as numerous other butterfly and moth species in turn affects bird populations. Adult birds can eat the berries of invasive plants, but their babies can only eat the soft butterfly and moth larvae usually found on the native plants these invasives are replacing.

Not all is gloom and doom, however. As participants at Sunday’s workshop learned, we can slow the rate of extinction and boost biodiversity and the food web by planting native plants, like milkweed, in our own backyards (and in the parks), and by removing the invasives that are taking their place.

Although not many plants (native or invasive) were coming up quite yet because of the late arrival of Spring, the group did manage to find plenty of emerging goutweed, garlic mustard, and mugwort plants to remove, and, as always, plenty of vines to cut away from our beautiful, native trees.

Thanks to all the Urban EcoStewards and other volunteers who helped to make the day a success, and to Jake Baechle and Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy Naturalist Mike Cornell for their knowledge, leadership, and insight.

paged
Loading posts...
magnifier
#009dba
on
loading
off