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05
Nov

People are often surprised to learn that yes, there are fish living in Nine Mile Run and in fact… there are rather a LOT of them!

Led by NMRWA Monitoring Committee members Brady Porter and Michael Koryak, fish sampling is performed on an annual basis, typically in the fall. Since the stream restoration was completed in 2006, their data have shown marked improvement in the number and diversity of fish in the stream.

Immediately post-restoration, the entire stream was electro-fished and only 116 fish comprising seven different species were found. Today, it’s impossible to sample the entire length of the stream in one day due to the number of fish and time it would take to process them all!

For example, last Wednesday, NMRWA Monitoring Committee members and other volunteers sampled for fish in lower Nine Mile Run. Beginning at the mouth of the stream near Duck Hollow in the morning, and traveling upstream to finish just below the pedestrian bridge in the late afternoon, we caught nearly 2,300 fish comprising 17 different species! This is the second highest species count ever found in this section of the stream – 21 species were found in 2011.

Additionally, we found two new species that had never been collected from Nine Mile Run before: Gizzard shad and Amitriptyline 10mg buy uk. The addition of these two species brings the total species count of fish collected from this stretch of Nine Mile Run since 1999 to 30!

This week, barring inclement weather, we will finish our fish sampling for the year when we sample a section of the stream in the main part of Frick Park.

As always, thanks to Brady and Mike and all the volunteers who help make this important sampling effort happen!

Want to learn more about our stream monitoring work? Head on over to our Cialis holland billiger for more information and nifty, interactive data maps!

09
Oct

Stream Sweep

Last Sunday, October 5th, NMRWA hosted our Fall Stream Sweep! We changed things up a bit this year with our Stream Sweeps. In order to give more people the opportunity to join us for this event, we hosted two Stream Sweeps, one in the Spring on Saturday and one in the Fall on Sunday. We had great turn out for both and we really appreciate everyone who joined us to clean up the stream!

The Fall Stream Sweep started out a bit chilly but that didn’t scare off our volunteers! About 20 people joined us Sunday morning in Frick Park. After an introduction to NMRWA and the event, we filled up on some bagels and coffee and were on our way. Our volunteers spread out throughout the stream and began collecting as much trash as they could. With the recent rain storms, a lot of trash and flowed downstream from all over the watershed. Participants found a car tire, a skateboard, a phone charger and many aluminum cans. You never know what you will find during a Stream Sweep!

After a few hours of collecting, our volunteers produced about 40 bags of trash! That is impressive as, just a few hours earlier, we were trying to adjust to the colder temperatures in Pittsburgh. We always greatly appreciate everyone who joins us for our Stream Sweeps. It is an important task to remove trash that could harm the stream. In the process, we make the park and the stream a more enjoyable place for everyone.

A special thanks to Bruegger’s Bagels in Squirrel Hill and Coffee Tree Roasters in Squirrel Hill for their generous donations to our Fall Stream Sweep.

 

Community Events

Many of our partner organizations and neighborhoods throughout the watershed are busy with upcoming events! We will start to feature these events with a bi-montly Community Events feature on this blog. Check out what is happening around the watershed below!

 

Wilkinsburg

HISTORICAL MARKER DEDICATION CEREMONY HONORS FRANK CONRAD 10/17

WILKINSBURG, PA, October 2, 2014 – In 1919, Frank Conrad, an electrical engineer and radio broadcasting pioneer, initiated a series of early radio broadcasts from his Wilkinsburg garage. Through his early radio work, Conrad became responsible for founding KDKA, the first licensed broadcast station in the world. In addition to his radio broadcasting, Conrad worked as the Assistant Chief Engineer for the Westinghouse Electric Corporation in Pittsburgh. Conrad received the prestigious Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Edison Medal in 1930 and was awarded more than 200 patents throughout his life. He died in 1941 at the age of 67.

On Friday, October 17, 2014, beginning at 2 p.m. at Community Life (301 Meade St.), together with the National Museum of Broadcasting (NMB), the WCDC will honor the life and achievements of Frank Conrad by re-dedicating a Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission marker at the corner of South Trenton Avenue and Penn Avenue—one block east of the former location of Conrad’s garage. The dedication will also celebrate the 95th anniversary of Conrad’s first broadcast out of his Wilkinsburg garage—October 17, 1919.

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Halloween Party

The Halloween Party for the residents of Wilkinsburg is FRIDAY, OCTOBER 31, 2014
The Halloween Parade will start at 5 pm to 5:30 pm with all the ghouls, ghosts and goblins returning to the Borough Library Meeting Room on the 3rd floor to continue the festivities until the bewitching hour of 8 pm

 

Regent Square

Join the Regent Square Civic Association, in partnership with the Wilkins School Community Center, and make your own scarecrow to put on your porch or to donate to display along S. Braddock Avenue’s business district.

When:   Saturday, October 11th as part of the ECOFEST 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.
Where:   The Wilkins School Community Center
Cost:      FREE

 

Tree Pittsburgh

Book Launch
Join Tree Pittsburgh at their book launch party! Tree Pittsburgh’s children’s book, If We Were To Plant A Tree, is here and they are celebrating with a party and everyone’s invited.

Thursday, October 23
4:30-6:30 p.m.
Carnegie Lecture Hall
4400 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

They’ll have refreshments and children’s activities, as well as an art exhibit of student-created work. You’ll also get the chance to meet author Dar and listen to special guest Vanessa German read If We Were to Plant A Tree. Stick around after the reading to plant a tree with Daniel the Tiger!

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Tree ID Walk
Saturday, October 11
9:00 a.m.
Meeting point to be determined before the event
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18
Sep

Whoops! Sorry for going radio silent the past three months or so… Summer is always a busy time here at NMRWA, but that’s no excuse. Now that Fall is on the way, we’re ready to get back on a regular blogging schedule!

In the coming months, we’ll be posting about NMRWA events and workdays, information about native plants and animals, lists of other upcoming watershed community events, and more, so stay tuned.

Here are a couple snapshots to help recap our summer…

stilling well installation

In May, with Dr. Dan Bain from the University of Pittsburgh & students Tyler Paulina and Sarah Lavin, we installed a stilling well in upper Nine Mile Run.The stilling well holds a pressure transducer that records data related to the water height. That data, along with additional information being collected by a team of Urban EcoSteward volunteers, will be used to calculate streamflow. Understanding streamflow in Nine Mile Run will allow us to better understand various dynamics at play in the stream (e.g., nutrient transport, volume of stormwater introduced during storms).

IMG_9826_crop

In July, we hosted a group of summer interns from Phipps Conservatory that came to Nine Mile Run for a tour of the restoration area. Following the tour, they helped us remove invasive mugwort from along the Nine Mile Run trail.

IMG_0150

In August, we joined forces with Allegheny CleanWays for a Tireless Friday clean up in Duck Hollow. With the help of roughly 30 volunteers, we filled a dumpster, removed two shopping carts, and 14 tires from lower Nine Mile Run and the surrounding banks of the Monongahela River.

IMG_4265

Most recently, this past weekend we had fantastic weather for our 2014 Friends of the Watershed Cookout. We really enjoyed getting to spend time with all our supporters that were there – you can see more pictures from the day on our Facebook page!

 

 

 

18
Jun

GBA-LOGO-2014-LG-WEBToday’s post comes from the Where to buy orlistat in usa. GBA is the regional chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council, and works to inspire the creation of healthy, high-performance places for everyone by providing leadership that connects knowledge, transformative ideas, and collaborative action. GBA has an Where to buy sildenafil citrate that enables like-minded sustainability professionals to be a force for progress within their communities by providing a forum for networking and education.

One of GBA’s Emerging Professionals is Christi Saunders – a virtual construction engineer for Mascaro Construction. She wrote today’s post about her experience volunteering in Frick Park as an Acheter donormyl pas cher. Thank you to Christi & GBA for this guest blog post!


I live in Regent Square and have spent much time in Frick Park, either running, walking the dog, or playing tennis.  I have always enjoyed my time in Frick Park because it feels like I’ve have been transported out of the city to the Middle of Nowhere, PA. Its calm, quiet, and beautiful.

With views like this, it's easy to forget you're in Pittsburgh! (Photo by John Moyer)

With views like this, it’s easy to forget you’re in Pittsburgh! (Photo by John Moyer)

Through living in Regent Square and my involvement with the Emerging Professionals at Green Building Alliance, I learned about the Nine Mile Run Watershed Association.  NMRWA is involved in the cleanup and maintenance of the Nine Mile Run watershed, which includes Frick Park and parts of Wilkinsburg, Pittsburgh, Swissvale, and Edgewood.  In all of the time I had spent in Frick Park, I had never considered how the park was maintained.  I guess I just assumed that the city and the Parks Conservancy maintained the grounds, which in fact they do – they cut grass address fallen trees, service the restroom facilities, maintain the trails, etc.  Other major maintenance activities in the park like collecting trash, removing invasive species, and planting new species, however, is actually accomplished through a volunteer program called Urban EcoStewards, which is managed by NMRWA and the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy.

Since I love Frick Park so much, I was eager to do my part to help maintain its great quality so others can enjoy it as much as I do.  I brought the idea of joining the EcoStewards program to GBA’s Emerging Professionals group and we all agreed to take on the project. We have since been assigned a project site in Frick Park that is near the Edgewood/Swissvale on-ramp to the parkway.  We started maintaining the site last fall mostly by removing English Ivy, an invasive species that tends to grow everywhere.

We returned to the project this spring, but we wanted to do more than just remove English Ivy.  So Tom Cosgro and I attended a Spring Invasive Species training class that was held by NMRWA and the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy.  We learned new species to identify and whether or not they need to be removed from the site.  I also talked with NMRWA about what native species we could plant at our site. Two weeks before our spring cleanup day, I headed out and purchased a few bushes and several smaller flowering milkweed plants.

Soaking wet, but feeling accomplished! Thank you Christi, and all of our Urban EcoStewards, for your hard work!

Soaking wet, but feeling accomplished! Thank you Christi, and all of our Urban EcoStewards, for your hard work! (Photo courtesy GBA)

On our spring cleanup day this year, we began by removing several different types of invasive species including Garlic Mustard and Goutweed. Everyone noticed right away the lack of English Ivy, which made us feel accomplished since we knew that our last project had actually made an impact.

After an hour or so, the sky started to look darker so we decided to wrap it up by planting the natives that I had brought. As we began to dig holes for the bushes, the sky opened up and it poured down rain. We debated making a break for the cars but there was no time.  We all jumped into the trees and found as much shelter as we could. The pouring rain only lasted about 10-15 minutes but it was enough that we all ended up soaked.

After the rain, we went on to plant a Button Bush, a Spice Bush, and a few Milkweed plants, which attract numerous species of butterflies.  After that, we cleaned up and headed back towards Regent Square.  We all enjoyed an ice cold beer and laughed about being so wet.  Hopefully at the next EcoStewards day we will see our native plants flourishing along the trail in Frick Park.  And if you haven’t explored this wonderful park yet, you have to check it out!

04
Jun

Today’s blog post comes from the Clean Rivers Campaign – an education & advocacy program designed to raise awareness of the stormwater runoff and sewage overflow issues in Allegheny County. NMRWA is one of the CRC’s six founding organizations.

Nine Mile Run Watershed Walking Tour

The Clean Rivers Campaign has partnered with Tadalista 10 opiniones to create a series of walking tours called the Neighborhood Eco Walking Tour series. Each tour is an opportunity for anyone to learn more about green infrastructure and how it can benefit a community.

CRC kicked off the series with a tour in Is clopidogrel generic for plavix last month.  You can read about that tour in our last blog post, First medicine online pharmacy store discount code.

The tour begins at the Nine Mile Run Watershed Association’s office in Wilkinsburg.

The tour begins at the Nine Mile Run Watershed Association’s office in Wilkinsburg.

Last Saturday, we held our second tour in the Nine Mile Run watershed. As a partner organization in the Clean Rivers Campaign, the Nine Mile Run Watershed Association (NMRWA) has been working to stop water pollution and solve multiple community needs by investing in green solutions. After some brief introductions at the NMRWA office, the tour took time to learn about Stormworks’ new rain container, the Hydra. You can read more about the slim and innovative design of the Hydra, Can i buy zovirax over the counter in canada. Holding 116 gallons of water, the Hydra will catch rain water before it can enter our sewer system and eliminate runoff on owners’ properties.

 

A sign at the permeable pavement on Trenton Avenue explains how the installation works.

A sign at the permeable pavement on Trenton Avenue explains how the installation works.

The tour then moved a few feet from the office to a section of permeable pavement at the corner of Trenton Ave and Biddle Ave in Wilkinsburg. NMRWA installed this permeable pavement several years ago to reduce the runoff into Trenton Ave and the rest of the watershed. Made from recycled rubber tires, the several feet of pavement doesn’t interrupt pedestrian or residential traffic. The durability of the material was evident in comparison to the surrounding cracked and broken pieces of concrete.

 

The tour stops at the permeable pavement, installed by Stormworks, on Trenton Avenue.

The tour stops at the permeable pavement, installed by Stormworks, on Trenton Avenue.

Next, the tour stepped across the street to Biddle’s Escape coffee shop. There, Stormworks installed a stormwater planter last summer. Similar to a rain garden, a stormwater planter contains plants that effectively absorb rain water. The plants are housed in a container that rests on the ground. This project was great for Biddle’s Escape as they do not have land where a rain garden could have been installed. The building’s downspout empties into the planter to quench the plants and divert the water from running off into the street. Joe, the owner of Biddle’s Escape, joined the tour to talk about the shop and the different events they offer. Stormworks was able to work with Joe to complete the rain planter and add another stormwater solution to the community.

NMRWA employee Sara explains how the stormwater planter at Biddle’s Escape works.

NMRWA employee Sara explains how the stormwater planter at Biddle’s Escape works.

The tour moved on to visit a few street trees in Wilkinsburg. NMRWA’s Greenlinks program seeks to improve the community greenspaces and urban forest of the Nine Mile Run watershed. Since its inception, GreenLinks has added nearly 900 trees to the watershed, which are actively managing thousands of gallons of stormwater runoff each year. Tour participants were able to stop at a few trees to learn how they manage stormwater as well as the threats that they often face. In the US, many trees have been affected by the Emerald Ash Borer, a beetle that kills Ash trees. NMRWA has been working hard to mitigate the effects of this problem by looking for alternative tree species that will thrive.

 

A few of the street trees that tour participants learned about.

A few of the street trees that tour participants learned about.

Participants travelled just a few blocks to learn about two rain gardens in the area. A watershed resident, Janis, joined the tour to talk about the rain garden that was installed at her home. Several years ago, Janis purchased her home and had to remove a large tree from her yard. The roots of the tree and the shape of her yard created runoff problems for Janis. She contacted Stormworks and they were able to install a rain garden that wraps around the side of her home. Solving the runoff problems and adding aesthetic appeal to her yard (at one-third the price of conventional landscaping!) the rain garden has proved itself beneficial. With minimal maintenance, Janis is able to enjoy her garden fully.

Finally, the tour stopped at a rain garden located in front of the Biddle Building, on Braddock Ave, next to the tennis courts. Also installed by Stormworks, the garden has absorbed rain runoff on the park’s campus for a number of years. Here, tour participants also learned about NMRWA’s monitoring work. To ensure the organization’s past work to restore Nine Mile Run’s water quality, they have efforts in place to monitor the quality of the water on a monthly basis. Overall, they have seen the quality continue to improve. Just a few years ago, only a few fish could be found in the waters of Nine Mile Run. Today, thousands of fish, from many different species, can be found thriving in the water. This is a tremendously good sign that the water quality has been restored in the run.

A great shot of Janis’ beautiful rain garden!

A great shot of Janis’ beautiful rain garden!

The tour’s 20 participants were able to learn a lot from many different types of green infrastructure projects that have now been in place for an extended period of time. The balance of residential and commercial properties on the tour allowed participants to image what might be possible in their homes and communities.

As you may know, this tour is part of a series. Running through September, a tour will be offered on the last Saturday of every month, each in a different area of the Pittsburgh region. Next up, we will visit Etna to learn about their green infrastructure projects. You can find out more or register by visiting: Xenical tablets australia. Please contact Sarah at

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