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GBA-LOGO-2014-LG-WEBToday’s post comes from the Buy avodart online uk. GBA is the regional chapter of the U.S. Green Building Council, and works to inspire the creation of healthy, high-performance places for everyone by providing leadership that connects knowledge, transformative ideas, and collaborative action. GBA has an Amoxicillin price usa that enables like-minded sustainability professionals to be a force for progress within their communities by providing a forum for networking and education.

One of GBA’s Emerging Professionals is Christi Saunders – a virtual construction engineer for Mascaro Construction. She wrote today’s post about her experience volunteering in Frick Park as an Buy tretinoin cream australia. Thank you to Christi & GBA for this guest blog post!


I live in Regent Square and have spent much time in Frick Park, either running, walking the dog, or playing tennis.  I have always enjoyed my time in Frick Park because it feels like I’ve have been transported out of the city to the Middle of Nowhere, PA. Its calm, quiet, and beautiful.

With views like this, it's easy to forget you're in Pittsburgh! (Photo by John Moyer)

With views like this, it’s easy to forget you’re in Pittsburgh! (Photo by John Moyer)

Through living in Regent Square and my involvement with the Emerging Professionals at Green Building Alliance, I learned about the Nine Mile Run Watershed Association.  NMRWA is involved in the cleanup and maintenance of the Nine Mile Run watershed, which includes Frick Park and parts of Wilkinsburg, Pittsburgh, Swissvale, and Edgewood.  In all of the time I had spent in Frick Park, I had never considered how the park was maintained.  I guess I just assumed that the city and the Parks Conservancy maintained the grounds, which in fact they do – they cut grass address fallen trees, service the restroom facilities, maintain the trails, etc.  Other major maintenance activities in the park like collecting trash, removing invasive species, and planting new species, however, is actually accomplished through a volunteer program called Urban EcoStewards, which is managed by NMRWA and the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy.

Since I love Frick Park so much, I was eager to do my part to help maintain its great quality so others can enjoy it as much as I do.  I brought the idea of joining the EcoStewards program to GBA’s Emerging Professionals group and we all agreed to take on the project. We have since been assigned a project site in Frick Park that is near the Edgewood/Swissvale on-ramp to the parkway.  We started maintaining the site last fall mostly by removing English Ivy, an invasive species that tends to grow everywhere.

We returned to the project this spring, but we wanted to do more than just remove English Ivy.  So Tom Cosgro and I attended a Spring Invasive Species training class that was held by NMRWA and the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy.  We learned new species to identify and whether or not they need to be removed from the site.  I also talked with NMRWA about what native species we could plant at our site. Two weeks before our spring cleanup day, I headed out and purchased a few bushes and several smaller flowering milkweed plants.

Soaking wet, but feeling accomplished! Thank you Christi, and all of our Urban EcoStewards, for your hard work!

Soaking wet, but feeling accomplished! Thank you Christi, and all of our Urban EcoStewards, for your hard work! (Photo courtesy GBA)

On our spring cleanup day this year, we began by removing several different types of invasive species including Garlic Mustard and Goutweed. Everyone noticed right away the lack of English Ivy, which made us feel accomplished since we knew that our last project had actually made an impact.

After an hour or so, the sky started to look darker so we decided to wrap it up by planting the natives that I had brought. As we began to dig holes for the bushes, the sky opened up and it poured down rain. We debated making a break for the cars but there was no time.  We all jumped into the trees and found as much shelter as we could. The pouring rain only lasted about 10-15 minutes but it was enough that we all ended up soaked.

After the rain, we went on to plant a Button Bush, a Spice Bush, and a few Milkweed plants, which attract numerous species of butterflies.  After that, we cleaned up and headed back towards Regent Square.  We all enjoyed an ice cold beer and laughed about being so wet.  Hopefully at the next EcoStewards day we will see our native plants flourishing along the trail in Frick Park.  And if you haven’t explored this wonderful park yet, you have to check it out!